Whole Wheat Cous Cous with Apple, Raisins & Green Onions

Cous cous make a great side and especially for juicy flavorful chicken dishes! Although I don’t make cous cous often, its the perfect side dish for entertaining since it’s both easy and quick to make. Cous cous is also easily customizable and takes well to both sweet and salty food pairings from anything to olive to dried cranberries.

Since I paired my cous cous with Ginger Chicken with Seasonal Fruit I wanted to incorporate similar flavors in the cous cous to bring out the sweetness in the chicken dish. And adding raisins, apples, and green onions, not only added tremendous flavor to the cous cous but a wonderful melange of colors that brightened up the dish.

Whole Wheat Cous Cous with Apple, Raisins, & Green Onions Recipe

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1/3 cup chopped green onions
  • 1 small apple peeled & diced
  • 1 1/2 cups water (or chicken broth)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup dry cous cous
  • 1/3 cup raisins

PREPARATIONS

  1. In a large saute pan heat one teaspoon of olive oil. When hot add apples and green onions and saute until fragrant (about 2-3 minutes) and leave aside.
  2. In the same pan, bring the water, one tablespoon olive oil, and salt to a boil. When the liquid mixture has reached a boil, pour in the cous cous, take of the heat and stir the mixture to combine. Add the raisins and keep the pan covered for five minutes. 
  3. Remove the lid and fluff the cooked cous cous with a fork and add the onion and apple mixture. 
  4. Drizzle a small amount of olive oil over the cous cous medley and serve!

Ahh, The Mediterranean

I’ve partaken in eating a significant amount of Mediterannean cuisine in the last month and I thought I’d share its intoxicating effects with you. This week I will expose some of my favorite Mediterranean foods and where they can be found so you can get a taste of the good life.

The highlights of the week are Spanikopita, Acili Ezme, Procuitto di San Daniele, and the wonderfully well known Feta Cheese. Spanakopita is a Greek pastry with a filling of spinach, feta cheese, onions, egg, and seasoning. The filling is wrapped in layers of phyllo pastry with butter and/or olive oil. Acili Ezme is chopped fresh spicy green peppers, vine ripened tomatoes, and onions with parsley. Procuitto di San Daniele is a dry-cured spiced Italian ham that is usually sliced thin and served raw. It is a traditional Italian antipasto, and my favorite! Lastly, Feta Cheese is a brined curd cheese traditionally made in Greece with goat’s and sheep milk. Feta can vary in flavor from salty to tangy and is now made in other regions.

This week’s posts will guide you to some of my favorite NYC spots where you can find the freshest Mediterranean ingredients around. Stay tuned for reviews and recipes including:

Limon
Ithaka

Greek Salad with Lemon Herb Chicken
Cavatappo